The Pride of Springfield Road

I met my love out walking in the merry month of May.
The birds were singing sweetly, and the Lambs did sport and play.
She told me that she loved me and to me she would prove true.
“If you will stay with me, my love, then I will stay with you.”

CHORUS
Oh, we walked along the dam and the birds sang loud and gay.
It was there I met my bonny brunette. She stole my heart away.
Her cheeks they were like roses red, and her skin as white as snow.
She is the darling of my heart, the pride of the Springfield Road.

Well, now we are to marry for my love has named the day,
And happy we will be together as we go on our way.
We’ll have a charming little house and a garden for to till,
And we’ll bring the children up like us to work in the cotton mill.

CHORUS
Oh, we walked along the dam and the birds sang loud and gay.
It was there I met my bonny brunette. She stole my heart away.
Her cheeks they were like roses red, and her skin as white as snow.
She is the darling of my heart, the pride of the Springfield Road.

Well, I’ll bid you all good night and to her parents I must go
To see if they will have me now, or if the answer is no.
She says they’ll treat me descent and my glass they’ll surely fill,
And they’ll drink a health to the bride and groom that work in the cotton mill.

CHORUS
Oh, we walked along the dam and the birds sang loud and gay.
It was there I met my bonny brunette. She stole my heart away.
Her cheeks they were like roses red, and her skin as white as snow.
She is the darling of my heart, the pride of the Springfield Road.

“Lintheads” is one of Irvine’s trilogies; in this case, he assembled two songs–linked by an instrumental piece–about the lives of mill workers on both sides of the Atlantic:
1. “The Pride of the Springfield Road” is an optimistic song Irvine learned from Maurice Leyden of Belfast, about the courtship of a young couple from the community around the cotton spinning mill located on that road;
2. “Lawrence Common” is Irvine’s instrumental composition inspired while walking on the Common in Lawrence, MA, “a piece of park land forever associated with the struggle and victory of the striking woolen mill workers in 1912”;
3. “Goodbye, Monday Blues” is the story of an old ‘linthead’ reminiscing about a whole life spent working in cotton mills, from “when I was a little boy” until “cotton dust has got my lungs”; it was written by Si Kahn from North Carolina.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s